Representation of Power
So who has the power? Very simply put, men have what seems to be most of the power. From the day a boy is born, to the day he becomes a man, to the day he dies, he will always have power. But what is power? In today’s society, power means to be strong, respected, wealthy, and even feared. These ideas of what power represent comes from the one place all ideas come from, the media. So who doesn’t have the power? Many minority groups have very few powers. Unfortunately women do count as a minority even though they count to about 50% of the population. Women have been fighting for equality for decades and although they have made major strides, the balance of power still has yet to shift.
In today’s world the media covers everything, from how we dress to the way we act. We as a society are controlled. Men with huge muscles to men in suits, power can look many different ways. The media also controls how women are perceived and it’s everything but powerful. From short skirts to crazy amounts of makeup, women are viewed based on bodies and to some that can be powerful, but to the majority of women it’s degrading.
Since the founding of this country, women have been fighting for equal rights. From voting rights to better wages, women have not given up. Though there is still much to do, and women know this.
Women all over the world seem to be sharing the same predicament. Though the U.S. is not the only country that has power gaps based on gender. In fact there are many countries that are far worse. In Middle Eastern countries such as Afghanistan, Iraq, and Egypt, women have very little rights. Women are even barred from walking outside without the escort of a male. In some regions, women can't even drive. In an article by Molly Hennessy of the L.A. Times, we read about how women in Egypt were detained from a peacefully protest and subject to “virginity tests”. These test were also forced and performed by a male. Although this is not going unnoticed the fact that an act so invasive could even be performed in this day of age is a scary thing and the fact that women have to put up with it just because of views based on power is wrong.

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Link to an interesting article:

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/babylonbeyond/2011/05/amnesty-international-egypt-virginity-tests.html

Growing up Male/Female.

Men and women have always been treated differently, whether it’s in the workplace, school or even in a home. Men constantly have to act tough and hide any form of emotion, while women have to act overly emotional and are constantly viewed on their looks. To many, this representation of genders is okay, though to a vast majority of the public these characteristics of each gender must change.
In the short film “Marry Me” directed by Michelle Lehman, the audience is able to take a look at the view of each gender specifically the feminine side. Although the film is only about seven minutes long, it accurately shows how women and young girls must act in order to be seen as an “equal”. The movie starts out with a young girl wishing to marry a quite boy who seems to want nothing to do with her. Only in the end, after the girl completely changes how she acts does the boy react.
Women have always had to change the way they act. Whether its plastic surgery or pounds of make-up, women just aren’t allowed to be themselves. They constantly have to prove worthy in order to further their life, careers, and so on. Who is responsible for this? There seems to be a variety of reasons this mindset exists. First and perhaps the most important is the fear among men that if women are given any form of power, than male dominance will no longer exist. This entire argument can also be related to the 1967 Boston Marathon in which a woman entered the then all-male marathon with the disapproval of many men including the race official Jock Semple. Semple’s view is still current, even 44 years later. Men are still worried that male power will decrease if women are allowed more freedom. Although women have many more, well deserved rights, including the right to participate in marathons, the fight for equality among men and women is still just as important.

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Link to an interesting article:
http://thesocietypages.org/socimages/2011/05/15/marry-me-a-short-film-by-michelle-lehman/

Representation of Difference
For years the view on homosexuals in the military has always been somewhat of a taboo. It should never be talked about. In fact, the very policy was titled “Don't Ask, Don't Tell”. The opinions differ from person to person. Though just recently the topic has been making headlines. Many men and women in the military have spoken out against the policy (now repealed). Unfortunately the view of gays in the army doesn't just exist in the military, it is talked about in school and workplaces as well.
Some feel very strongly that the government should not allow gays in the military; others feel that any man or women should have a right to fight for his/her country. Both have a right to there opinion. The “Don't Ask, Don't Tell” policy has been in-effect since the revolutionary war although not sharing the same name. For many years African Americans were not allowed to fight in the military, and neither were women. Years after the repeal of barring African Americans and women from service we still have the most powerful military in the world if not stronger. If the color of a person’s skin, or gender doesn’t effect combat situations, then why should sexual preference?
In an article by Ed O’Keefe of the Washington Post the exposure of sexual preference was “grounds for discharge” and over 13,000 troops have in fact been kicked out of the military for revealing homosexuality.
As I said early this doesn't just exist in the military. It is talked about constantly in the workplace in schools and in homes. The topic can make some feel uncomfortable. It can even make people angry. Though when we as a society shun or make it seem as if how someone acts is wrong, then we are not just pushing away a soldier, were pushing away citizens, family members, and friends.


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Link to an interesting article:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/12/18/AR2010121801729.html

Link to Another Student Wiki

“In the media, homosexuality is the topic of many jokes and through watching numerous television shows and movies it has become a part of our culture. People in society find it appropriate and even acceptable to use discriminating remarks against gays.” I liked this quote from Rachel Cerutti’s wiki it really puts it in perspective on why things like the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy weren’t that important to people until just recently. Jokes from movies and television shows don’t help like Rachel said. In fact the more we joke about a topic the less legitimate it seems.
“Gays are not only portrayed in the media negatively through discriminating jokes, but also in the typical stereotype they receive.” This quote also stood out to me because shows do tend to stereotype characters. Shows might as well put a message out telling the world “this is how everyone acts.” The sad thing is that many people watch television shows and actually believe what they are watching to be true, and base their beliefs on it.
On last quote that I thought was interesting was “Media is extremely influential on Americans and especially on teenagers today.” Kids do tend to follow what they see on television so when they see a gay boy acting weak and feminine it sends the wrong message.